Financial Sustainability

Understanding Social Enterprise Profitability

Emily Olsen-Harbich

Emily Olsen-Harbich

Emily is interested in challenging traditional community development norms to solve complex social issues at scale. She's worked at the grassroots level as a community extension agent in Peace Corps Cameroon and managed cross-sector initiatives while working in management consulting for a Washington, DC based firm. Emily's experience creating compelling communications tools, including an award winning documentary film, help her to support and enhance the inspiring work of Catalyst Kitchens members around the country.

Foodservice has razor thin margins; add a training program and those margins become even thinner. We talk about the importance of understanding true costs and allocating training expenses to accurately calculate profits.

Four Top Strategies for Financial Sustainability for Catalyst Kitchens

Renee Martin

Renee Martin

Renée got her entrepreneurial experience in the (insanely) fast moving digital media sector where she launched and developed several startups. After that she pivoted to be a leadership consultant to nonprofits and social entrepreneurs. As Director, Renée oversees Catalyst Kitchens as a whole. She is responsible for social enterprise sustainability and program impact for both membership and consulting. 

It goes without saying that financial sustainability is critical to the success of social enterprise job training programs. Since our model is a complex hybrid between private enterprise and public nonprofit funding, it is important to know where one ends and the other begins. What steps can you take to ensure your food service business and job training program are sustainable and thriving?

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